Large-Area High-Performance Transparent Electrodes for Pen/Touch Sensor Research

Transparent electrodes (TEs) combine high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, useful in different devices such as light-emitting diodes, displays and solar cells. A highly competitive market of electronic devices, such as phones and flexible touch screens as well as a worldwide increasing demand for energy, drives research to improve the performance of TEs. However, mass production of high-performance TEs is expensive due to costly materials and fabrication techniques.

Application and investigation of new material in tandem solar cells with enhancing IR spectral absorption

Solar cells which convert solar energy directly into electricity are among one of the most viable solutions to the world’s foreseeable energy crisis and global environmental issues. One key strategy to improve the efficiency of solar cells is to enhance the overlap between their absorption spectra and the solar spectrum. When two or more subcells with distinct and complementary absorption spectra are stacked, the tandem solar cells are created and a broader range of the solar spectrum can be absorbed and more solar energy can be harvested.

Thermoplastic injection molding of bioprinter cartridges using silicon inserts

Patients who suffer from severe burns require immediate wound closure to ensure survival and facilitate healing. The current gold standard in surgical practice is the use of split-surface autographs, allographs, or skin substitutes, but limitation range from the lack of layered tissue organization, the potential for immunological rejection, and the need for high quantities of donated tissue.

Characterization and Improvement of Interfacial Properties of Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Hybrid Aqueous Batteries

Using surface characterization techniques, the relationship between the surface hydrophilicity level of the positive electrode and the electrochemical performance of a rechargeable aqueous battery system will be investigated. Oxygen is generated during the battery operation due to the decomposing of water, the solvent for the electrolyte, and may cover the surface of the positive electrode, thus hinder the battery operation.

Development of fabrication, microstructure and performance relationships in inkjet printed polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes for automotive applications

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) running on hydrogen are a preferred choice for on-board electricity generation in automobiles. A major challenge associated with this technology is its high cost due to the use of platinum as electrocatalyst. Implementation of inkjet printing as a fabrication tool has been investigated by the applicant and the academic supervisor to fabricate and test PEFC electrodes that are 5 times thinner and contain 15 times lower platinum than conventional electrodes resulting in an improved catalyst utilization.

Implementing a novel infectious disease diagnosis assay to a microfluidic device

Infectious diseases ranging from avian influenza to Ebola virus infection are among the most serious health emergencies in Canada and globally. Current diagnosis methods such as cell culture, ELISA and PCR suffer from inaccuracy, high-cost and lengthy procedures. Therefore, there has been a growing trend to develop new point-of-care diagnostic tools and microfluidic devices are considered as an important enabling technology owing to its advantages in miniaturization, precise fluidic control, low-cost and high-throughput.

Development and Evaluation of a Rapid Diagnostic Assay for Avian Influenza to the Point of Care Setting

Ontario's chicken industry contributes $2.72 billion to Canadian economy, and supports 19,183 full-time equivalent jobs (Ontario Chicken Industry Report, 2013). To date, 2015 has seen 309 individual outbreaks of avian influenza (AI) reported to the World Organization for Animal Health, a 147% increase on outbreaks reported in 2014. In Ontario alone, 29 farms were quarantined in April 2015 due to AI outbreak (CFIA, 2015).

Injection molded bioprinter cartridges

Patients who suffer from severe burns require immediate wound closure to ensure survival and facilitate healing. The current gold standard in surgical practice is the use of split-surface autographs, allographs, or skin substitutes, but limitation range from the lack of layered tissue organization, the potential for immunological rejection, and the need for high quantities of donated tissue.

The development of single-cell RNA-sequencing methods for identification of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in leukemic stem cells

Targeted cancer therapies have significantly improved the treatment of leukemias, but emergence of treatment resistance and subsequent cancer relapse significantly reduces patient survival. This relapse is primarily caused by the inability of current therapies to eradicate leukemic stem cells. It is currently extremely challenging to study these stem cells, due to its rarity in patient blood samples.

Conductance detection using granular films

Universal NanoSensor Technologies (UNS-Tech) develops and commercializes microfabricated conductivity detectors. In this MITACS project, UNS-Tech will partner with Prof. Cynthia to explore new detector architectures based on nano-particle and nano-shell films. The results will be analyzed and the findings will be published in scientific journals. The intern participating in this cluster will benefit from this internship by gaining tremendous knowledge of electronics-based detectors.

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