Toxicopathological Determination of Safe Dose Ranges of Neonicotinoids for Honey Bee Colonies

The ‘gold standard’ mammalian safety toxicopathological tests are very sensitive and reproducible examinations used by veterinary pathologists in the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies to detect sublethal toxic effects of candidate drugs, pesticides and other chemicals in laboratory animals to determine the safe dose range of these medications/chemicals for humans and animals. However, comparable toxicopathological approaches using histopathology have not been developed for honey bees.

Toward an Understanding of Beautiful Feather Cover in Laying Hens

Feather pecking (FP) in egg-laying hens, where individuals peck repetitively and excessively at other birds to pull out and eat their feathers, is a challenge for the industry with large economic and welfare implications. High prevalence of FP is reported (60-80%) and this is associated with mortality rates of up to 20-40%, which translates to hundreds of millions of birds dying due to FP every year.

Rapid Quantification of Bovine Colostrum Immunoglobulin G and Macronutrients(Fat, Proteins and Lactose) Using FTIR Spectroscopy

Colostrum is the initial secretion from the mammary gland after parturition and it is a crucial source of immunity and nutrition for
newborn calves. Because of the placental barrier to immunoglobulin transfer in ruminants, colostrum provides the neonate with
immunoglobulins (mainly IgG) essential for passive immunity that plays a key role in the prevention of respiratory and digestive
infections in newborn calves. Colostrum macronutrients (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) are vital metabolic fuels for newborn
calves in the first days of life.

Management of group-housed sows: optimizing mixing time and environmental enrichment to improve welfare and productivity

Pork producers in Canada are in the process of transitioning from stall housing to group housing systems for gestating sows. The greatest concern with this change is the problem of aggression when pregnant sows are mixed. Mixing frequently results in aggressive interactions among sows, and can affect reproduction and cause welfare problems. Typically sows are held in stalls for several weeks after insemination to minimize stress during embryo implantation, however there is increasing pressure to reduce the time that sows are kept in stalls.

Modeling the Risks and Damages from a “Potential” Invasive Plant Species: Yellow Starthistle in British Columbia

The purpose of this research project is to forecast the timing and estimate the costs of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) invasion into southern British Columbia. Yellow Starthistle is an invasive plant that has caused tens of millions of dollars of damages to agricultural production in the United States as well as millions of dollars of costs in the form of reduction of soil moisture, losses of biodiversity and tourism.

Microbial modifying properties of iodinated water in animal production

The iodination of water has been identified as a means to improve animal performance, particularly in the poultry industry. Iodine has been used as an antimicrobial agent under several applications, however, it is unclear how water iodination results in improved animal performance. We hypothesize that iodinated water can improve performance either by reducing pathogen load, or by altering the intestinal microbial community. BioLargo Water, Inc., specializes in leveraging iodine chemistry for applications in water treatment.

Phase II: Genomics and Lipid Studies for Flavour Selection in Pork

The hog industry in Manitoba is a very efficient means of converting grains and pulses into
high quality protein. Fresh pork is a healthy and nutritious source of protein, yet demand
remains static. One of the main reasons cited by consumers for not choosing pork is the
absence of good taste in modern pork. The objective of this project, which is a continuation
from Phase I of this project is to get fresh pork back on the dinner table by restoring its
flavour.

Characterization of the diversity, genetics and genomics of common scab causing Streptomyces spp. in eastern Canada

Common scab is a world-wide potato disease that is responsible for important economic losses. The control of the disease is difficult and soil fumigation is often the only approach available. In Atlantic Canada, crop losses associated with common scab are economically important and the disease has been progressing in severity. Therefore, Dr. Filion, in association with Cavendish Farms, is working on the characterization of the diversity, genetics and genomics of Streptomyces spp. causing common scab of potato.

Evaluating the potential of using a Canadian Sudangrass hybrid and ryegrass as companion crops for alfalfa establishment

Alfalfa is a legume forage crop that is intensively grown in Canada and represents a major feed source for livestock ruminants (i.e. dairy cows). When establishing pure stands of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) there are two primary options to minimize weed encroachment: the use of herbicides or the use of companion crops. Companion crops will minimize weed development during the establishment year, provide more harvestable forage biomass, and reduce risks of erosion.

Determination of the physicochemical properties of flaxseed oil extractedusing an innovative cold-pressing/filtering system

As one of the healthiest edible oils on the market, flaxseed oil is mostly promoted for its high Omega-3 content.
Regrettably, flaxseed oil is unsuitable for cooking because of its low smoke point. AlliggaTM’s innovative cold pressing/filtering system has remarkably revolutionized this nutritious oil, making it a quality oil to cook with,
while maintaining the richest content of Omega-3 essential fatty acids of any other cooking oil. This project will
determine the frying qualities of Alligga TM flaxseed cooking oil and compare this with other common cooking oils
on the Canadian market.

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