Assessing trust of artificial intelligence technology in the context of workplace relations

The goal of the project is to gain insight into individuals’ reactions to an artificial intelligence (AI) product currently in development at Kiite. The product is designed to fulfill some of the role responsibilities typically occupied by a manager. Trust is an important factor in both leader-employee relationships and in user experiences with AI-based systems. Thus, the partnership with Kiite offers a novel research opportunity to contribute to an emerging area of research on when and why humans are liable to (dis)trust AI technology in the workplace.

Evaluating a Single-Site Supportive Housing Program for People with Serious Mental Illness and Histories of Homelessness

This project will involve an evaluation of a program to house people who have serious mental illness, and who have had experiences of homelessness. There will be two parts to this study. First, the study will examine how this program has been implemented. A study of the implementation of the program will provide information that the program can use to improve how the program functions. Second, the study will examine the outcomes for people who are housed through the program. A key outcome to be examined will be whether people who are housed able to keep their housing.

Understanding and improving techniques to teach financial literacy in children

Youths spend over $141 billion annually. Yet, these same youth often demonstrate extremely poor understanding of healthy financial habits such as emergency funds and budgeting. The proposed project seeks to tackle two main questions through the Dojo financial literacy learning application. First, what principles/techniques have been shown to positively impact financial literacy (e.g., interactive games, infographics, etc)? Second, is the Dojo platform an effective tool for teaching children about financial literacy?

Exploring the lived experience of survivors: The link between intimate partner violence (IPV) and traumatic brain injury (TBI)

Past research has established that a high percentage of women in violent relationships experience a traumatic brain injury (TBI), with one article estimating approximately 23 million women in the US living with a TBI from intimate partner violence (IPV) (Ivany & Schminkey, 2016). While previous research has focused on establishing the link between IPV and TBI, further research needs to be conducted into the experiences of these women. The present project seeks to do exactly that, through interviewing of 6-8 women from The Cridge Centre for the Family.

Regulating Abnormal Connectivity in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder via Real-time fMRI Neurofeedback

Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are characterized by decreased prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulation on hyperactive emotion generation regions, such as the amygdala. Real-time (rt)-fMRI neurofeedback allows for localized brain regions to be self-regulated through neuroimaging signal feedback. Recently within our lab, learning to decrease amygdala activation via neurofeedback was shown to normalize the neural circuitry maintaining PTSD, which was negatively correlated to symptoms.

Perceptual training in melanoma diagnosis using skin lesion images

Melanoma, the most deadly type of skin cancer, has increasing incidence and a high mortality rate. Early diagnosis of melanoma is currently the only way to reduce the mortality rate as well as the health care cost of treating melanoma. However, the existing approaches in training melanoma diagnosis are not effective. In this project, we will evaluate a perceptual approach, which mirrors how dermatologists improve their ability in melanoma diagnosis, to train melanoma diagnosis.

Improving signal processing in hearing aids to support music and emotional speech - Year 2

Hearing aid research has traditionally focused on improving speech intelligibility for people with hearing loss, but there is increasing interest in addressing other aspects of hearing that contribute to quality of life, particularly music and other non-linguistic information. Listening to music through hearing aids is often dissatisfying due to distortions introduced by current algorithms. Hearing aids restore the intelligibility but not the emotional content of speech, which is carried by acoustic cues that are similar to salient dimensions of music.

Cognitive and well-being impacts of tunable LED lighting in secondary school students

The current project aims to examine how tunable LED lighting influences productivity and well-being in students at the Port Coquitlam’s Riverside secondary school. The project aims to identify the optimal lighting conditions in order to maximize productivity and well-being in healthy students as well as students with special needs. We hypothesize that the tunable LED lighting that is consistent with the natural daylight cycle will be more beneficial to students than standard constant lighting condition in an average classroom.

Reducing homelessness using direct cash transfers and motivational interventions

This project aims to examine the effect of unconditional direct cash-transfers to recently homeless individuals in Vancouver, BC, Canada. We will conduct a randomized controlled trial to distribute a one-time unconditional $7,500 cash lump sum to 50 recently homeless individuals from shelters in Vancouver. We will also provide a supplementary motivational training for half of the participants. We will also recruit 50 recently homeless individuals as a control group, and half of these participants will also receive motivational training.

Advancing Data Science Research for Social Good

Due to rapid development of technology, such as the Internet of Things, collecting data is easier and cheaper than ever before. As a result, municipal governments and urban centres across Canada are being inundated with data—data that have potential to improve public service. Despite this, local governments do not have enough data expertise to extract insight from these overwhelming datasets, which are often unstructured and “dirty” (i.e., incomplete, inaccurate, and/or erroneous).

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